If it’s to be

If it’s to be, it’s up to me.

— William H. Johnsen

The rhetorical device and/or Greek figure used is rhyme, where you duplicate a sound in words, or parts of words.

Also, from a persuasive stand point, it’s a self/others point of view.  It’s what some would call a locus of control, or an orientation metaprogram.  Click here for more on the self/others metaprogram.

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Til We Have Faces

Child, to say the very thing you really mean, the whole of it, nothing more or less or other than what you really mean; that’s the whole art and joy of words.

— Til We Have Faces by C.S. Lewis

The rhetorical device and/or Greek figure used is periphrasis, where you intentionally wordy, or not.

This quote and label contributed by Michael C Wagner.  Thanks, Mike!

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Every this Every that

“a guy hitting every mark, nailing every line, every joke, with a full house screaming.”

&

“I missed practice. We’re talking about practice … practice is for amateurs, you know?”

— Charlie Sheen, as quoted on TodayShow.com

The rhetorical device and/or Greek figure used is palilogia, for repeating in several different clauses.  This applies to both mutually exclusive usages of every and practice

Context of quotes on TodayShow.com,

Sheen insisted that the drug- and alcohol-fueled behavior he described as “epic” never interfered with his work on “Men,” and that despite all the headlines, all his bosses saw when he showed up on the set was “a guy hitting every mark, nailing every line, every joke, with a full house screaming.” He claimed he never missed a day’s shooting: “Not a day that cost anybody any money,” he said. “I missed practice. We’re talking about practice … practice is for amateurs, you know?”

Be sure to check out the A Drug Called Charlie Sheen post for another Charlie quote.

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A drug called Charlie Sheen

I am on a drug, it’s called Charlie Sheen.

— Charlie Sheen

The rhetorical device and/or Greek figure used is anthimeria, where you take a word in one part of speech, like a noun (in this case, a proper noun) and make it a different part of speech, like a regular noun for something else; and metonymy, where the name of the chemical reactions of the drug is swapped out, entirely, with a thing called “Charlie Sheen,” to stand in for it.

Be sure to check out the Two and a Half Men post for another Charlie quote.

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Two and a Half Men

[creator Chuck Lorre is] a stupid, stupid little man and a pu**y punk that I never want to be like.

— Charlie Sheen

The rhetorical devices and/or Greek figures used are the figure of repetition epizeuxis for stupid stupid (battologia for the vain repetition); alliteration (Greek figure homoeoprophoron) of pu**y punk; cacemphaton for the foul language; 

Side note: name-calling is not an ad hominem attack. 

See and read about this at TMZ.com (click picture for link).

The back story:

“TMZ has learned “Two and a Half Men” will immediately stop production for the rest of the season … because of Charlie’s escapades in the last few days … most recently what he said to TMZ.”

Check out FallacyFiles.org for more on argumentum ad hominem.

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Teeth or tails

Winter either bites with its teeth or lashes with its tail.

— Proverb

The persuasive element is selectional restriction violation as winter doesn’t literally have teeth or tails, therefore cannot bite or lash.  Even though, it’s not quite an anthropomorphism as the qualities are not attributed to humans, as talking would be, for example, but, nonetheless, similar. (seems like too many commas)

Is there a Greek figure, or rhetorical device or figure, that more closely describes this?  Likely, yes.  If you know of it, please let me know quotesmagic@gmail.com

See and read about this quote and others at QuoteGarden.com.

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Savor a bad mood

I like these cold, gray winter days. Days like these let you savor a bad mood.

— Bill Watterson

The rhetorical device, or Greek figure, is syncrisis, because of the pattern of the close comparison through similarity with something else, but isn’t quite an alloiosis because it isn’t a this-isn’t-that pattern.

See and read about this quote and others at QuoteGarden.com.

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Winter sass

Winter is nature’s way of saying, “Up yours.”

— Robert Byrne

The rhetorical figure, is snoclone. It’s a snoclone because it follows a familiar (yet elusive origin) pattern of “X is Y’s way of saying Z;” anthropomorphism due to the fact that winter is not a person capable of saying, well, anything; and prosopopoeia (also, an NLP “quotes” technique) given that the author is speaking through winter’s voice.

See and read about this quote and others at QuoteGarden.com.

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The world will know peace

When the power of love overcomes the love of power the world will know peace.

–Jimi Hendrix

The Greek figure and/or rhetorical device is antimetabole, as the power-love-love-power creates an obvious ABBA pattern using the exact same words (which distinguishes it from a chiasmus.)

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King’s Speech

I always thought the film should be called  “The King’s Speech Therapist .”

Geoffrey Rush, on the Today Show 2011 Feb 07 while being interviewed for his masterful role in The King’s Speech

The persuasive element is reformed cliché-esque. The actual title of the big picture drama is The King’s Speech, but the movie is more about Geoffrey’s character who is a speech therapist specializing in “speech defects.”  Because the title isn’t really a cliché, it’s not really a reformed cliché, thus the “-esque. (which is French for “-ish!” :) )”

Thanks to Today.MSNBC.MSN.com for posting their easy-to-use clip & share video and transcript of the interview.

Visit msnbc.com for breaking news, world news, and news about the economy

NPR.org jumped on the the-kings-speech-therapist-why-didnt-they-make-that-movie-instead bandwagon, also.

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