Tag Archives: repetition

The world will know peace

When the power of love overcomes the love of power the world will know peace. –Jimi Hendrix The Greek figure and/or rhetorical device is antimetabole, as the power-love-love-power creates an obvious ABBA pattern using the exact same words (which distinguishes … Continue reading

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It’s better to have it

It is better to have it and not need it than to need it and not have it. –Woodrow Call (actor Tommy Lee Jones) The Greek figure and/or rhetorical device is antimetabole, as the have-need-need-have creates an obvious ABBA pattern … Continue reading

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Having ego so close

Avoid having your ego so close to your position that when your position falls, your ego goes with it. –Colin Powell The Greek figure and/or rhetorical device is antimetabole, as the ego-position-position-ego creates an obvious ABBA pattern using the exact … Continue reading

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How many different feet

Back feet Front feet Feet, feet, feet.  How many different feet you meet! –Dr. Seuss, The Foot Book The Greek figures, or rhetorical devices, used is antistrophe/epistrophe/epiphora, as in the repetition of the last word (feet) in successive clauses, or thoughts; epizeuxis for … Continue reading

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Left foot left foot

Left foot  Left foot Right foot Right –Dr. Seuss, The Foot Book The Greek figures, or rhetorical devices, used is palilogia, as in the repeating of the phrase left foot; epanalepsis used with the right foot right where the first … Continue reading

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The Foot Book

The Foot Book –Dr. Seuss, book title The Greek figure, or rhetorical device, is assonance, due to the foot and the book having the same vowel sound and being right next to each other “like a rhyme.” Are there more of … Continue reading

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Feet in the day

Feet in the day. Feet in the night. –Dr. Seuss, The Foot Book The Greek figures, or rhetorical devices, used is anaphora, as in the repetition of the first word in successive clauses, or thoughts; and isocolon for the repetition of … Continue reading

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Let’s check

… Maybe there’s something in Backpack to help us see when the sun is too bright. Let’s check. … –Dora the Explorer in Swim, Boots, Swim! The Greek figure, or rhetorical device, used is assonance, as the e in let’s … Continue reading

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Good strong kicks

Now she’s showing him how to kick his legs. Good strong kicks, Boots! –Dora the Explorer in Swim, Boots, Swim! The Greek figure, or rhetorical device, used is polyptoton, as kick and kicks are the same word in a different … Continue reading

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Let’s swim!

It’s time to jump in the water. Let’s swim! ¡Vamos a nadar! –Dora the Explorer in Swim, Boots, Swim! The Greek figure, or rhetorical device, used is commoratio, as jump in the water and swim are synonymous.  So is ¡Vamos a … Continue reading

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