Tag Archives: rhetoric

A drug called Charlie Sheen

I am on a drug, it’s called Charlie Sheen. — Charlie Sheen The rhetorical device and/or Greek figure used is anthimeria, where you take a word in one part of speech, like a noun (in this case, a proper noun) and … Continue reading

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Two and a Half Men

[creator Chuck Lorre is] a stupid, stupid little man and a pu**y punk that I never want to be like. — Charlie Sheen The rhetorical devices and/or Greek figures used are the figure of repetition epizeuxis for stupid stupid (battologia for … Continue reading

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Teeth or tails

Winter either bites with its teeth or lashes with its tail. — Proverb The persuasive element is selectional restriction violation as winter doesn’t literally have teeth or tails, therefore cannot bite or lash.  Even though, it’s not quite an anthropomorphism as the … Continue reading

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Winter sass

Winter is nature’s way of saying, “Up yours.” — Robert Byrne The rhetorical figure, is snoclone. It’s a snoclone because it follows a familiar (yet elusive origin) pattern of “X is Y’s way of saying Z;” anthropomorphism due to the fact … Continue reading

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The world will know peace

When the power of love overcomes the love of power the world will know peace. –Jimi Hendrix The Greek figure and/or rhetorical device is antimetabole, as the power-love-love-power creates an obvious ABBA pattern using the exact same words (which distinguishes … Continue reading

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Heads I win

Heads I win, tails you lose, to the never mind, When to draw the line. — Draw The Line, Aerosmith The rhetorical device, or Greek figure of speech, is autophasia.  Autophasia is extremely similar to a catch 22, where either way, you’re … Continue reading

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Take me drunk

Take me drunk, I’m home. –Any American ever drunk The Greek figure and/or rhetorical device is anastrophe, as revealed by the switching of the word order. See and read about this quote and others at UKY.edu. Click a tag below … Continue reading

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It’s better to have it

It is better to have it and not need it than to need it and not have it. –Woodrow Call (actor Tommy Lee Jones) The Greek figure and/or rhetorical device is antimetabole, as the have-need-need-have creates an obvious ABBA pattern … Continue reading

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Blind leading blind

The blind leading the blind. The Greek figure, or rhetorical device, is epanalepsis, because the blind is the first and last thought with words in between. See this quote and others at Quote/CounterQuote.com.  Interesting site.  Interesting slant on presenting and … Continue reading

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Having ego so close

Avoid having your ego so close to your position that when your position falls, your ego goes with it. –Colin Powell The Greek figure and/or rhetorical device is antimetabole, as the ego-position-position-ego creates an obvious ABBA pattern using the exact … Continue reading

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